Why ‘retired’ lawyer’s wife is suing over unpaid fees

A former Arizona law firm managing its clients’ medical bills is asking a judge to toss out a lawsuit filed by a retired Arizona attorney who says his wife has been using her own money to cover expenses.

Cathy Eagan sued her former partner, James Eagan, in January.

He is one of several law firms in the Phoenix area that have taken the practice of billing clients for fees that go to Eagan’s own legal fees, according to a complaint filed Thursday in Arizona Superior Court.

The complaint claims that Eagan used her own funds to pay Eagan for his own legal work, including a deposition that was not available to the public, the lawsuit said.

Eagan has denied using his wife’s legal fees to pay for her legal work.

Eagan was not immediately available for comment.

A lawyer representing Eagan did not immediately respond to a request for comment Thursday.

Eagans attorney, Matthew Breen, said the lawsuit is the result of an abuse of discretion by the judge and the legal profession.

Egan filed a complaint against Eagan in January, accusing him of making false statements and failing to pay his own bills.

Egan claims he was told he was going to be paid a $50,000 fee in March, but instead he was paid $1,500, Eagan said in the complaint.

Egans attorney said that Egan did not want his attorney representing him.

The lawsuit was filed by the lawyer’s former wife, Jennifer Eagan.

Eggans former husband, James, is a former member of the Arizona Supreme Court.

Evan, a Phoenix-based attorney, said in a statement that he believes the lawsuit unfairly targets Egan’s wife and is not about justice.

He added that Egans wife has done the right thing by not paying her own bills, but that the lawsuit has gone beyond that.

The Arizona Attorney General’s Office said in an email Thursday that Egonas attorney had requested a restraining order against the lawsuit.

The attorney said the order was granted.

Egonas wife did not respond to requests for comment on Thursday.

In response to a CNNMoney question about Egans lawsuit, the attorney for the attorney’s former spouse said, “I would respectfully disagree with your characterization.”

Trump, DeVos push agenda of big business with ‘shovel ready’ tax bill

The Republican-led Congress on Tuesday passed a sweeping overhaul of U.S. tax laws, but not before some tax experts and tax advocates complained that the legislation was still too light on details to make a dent in the nation’s $4.4 trillion federal deficit.

President Donald Trump signs an executive order in the Oval Office of the White House on Feb. 25, 2021.

The White House says the administration will be working closely with the House of Representatives and Senate to pass the tax legislation.

(Photo: Evan Vucci, AP)The sweeping rewrite of the nation�s tax laws passed by the Senate and the House on Tuesday would give a boost to businesses and investors who already have benefited from a temporary tax cut.

The legislation would reduce the top tax rate from 39.6% to 35%, raise the child tax credit and phase out the alternative minimum tax, all of which are scheduled to expire at the end of the year.

The bill also would make a $10,000 gift to children and families with dependents for a year and a $500 credit for people who work with children.

It also would eliminate the state and local tax deduction, the mortgage interest deduction and the estate tax.

The legislation includes the largest changes to the tax code since the 1986 tax overhaul and comes as Trump and Democrats in Congress look to pass a budget blueprint that could be finalized in the coming weeks.

As the House passed its tax bill Tuesday, the Senate voted 81-28 to begin debate on the measure.

The vote was 52-46 in favor of the bill, with Republican Sens.

Mike Lee of Utah and Thom Tillis of North Carolina voting against the bill.

Tillis and Lee are the only two senators to vote against the tax bill.

The tax bill also includes an extension of an emergency funding measure that Congress approved last month in the wake of the devastating hurricane that hit the East Coast.

The measure will fund the government through March 19.

Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer of New York and other Democrats said they were concerned that the bill would not provide the $5.4 billion in funding that was requested in last month�s emergency measure.

Schumer said in a statement, “The president, Vice President Pence, and their party-line allies in the House have made it clear that their tax bill will do nothing to help families and small businesses.”

The White House said Tuesday that the tax measure will help close loopholes and simplify the tax system.

It also said that the $1.6 trillion measure will reduce the deficit by $1 trillion over 10 years.

The administration has made it a priority to close loopholes, and the administration is currently working with Congress on a package to achieve this goal.

It will also help small businesses avoid taxes and help the middle class, the White Court said.

But tax experts said they had mixed feelings about the bill.�It is not good enough for the president to call this a win,� said Larry Kudlow, president of the Tax Policy Center, a think tank that has been studying the bill for months.�We know that a lot of the tax cuts that the president campaigned on, especially on the corporate side, were not going to be there.

They were going to hurt people.�Kudlow said that Republicans in the Senate have not included enough language in the legislation that would ensure that taxpayers are not left paying more in taxes than they earn.

The White Court has also said the tax plan will help middle-class families and low-income Americans, including those who earn $50,000 to $100,000.

It would also benefit businesses that have invested in research and development.

The Senate passed the bill in a 52-48 party-lines vote, with all Democrats opposed.

Republicans have said they have been working with Democrats to hammer out details and speed up debate on tax legislation since they took control of Congress in the summer.

They say they are committed to working with the White Houses office of tax policy, which they believe would be able to quickly craft legislation to get it done.

The House is scheduled to vote on the tax-reform legislation in the early hours of Wednesday morning.

The Senate is expected to vote later in the day.

Couple sued over ‘fidelity’ scheme

A couple is suing a business for allegedly making them believe they were getting “fidelity” and other benefits for being married.

The couple says the business was a fraud and that they were deceived.

The New York Post reported Tuesday that the couple filed suit against a rental property agency and two women who claimed they were being cheated out of their money and marital privileges.

They allege that the woman had sex with the man, who they believe was their “husband,” in a hotel room.

The suit claims the woman paid $1,000 for a trip to New York City, paid $2,000 to be taken out for dinner, paid another $1.50 for a taxi ride to the airport, and paid another fee for a massage.

The man was allegedly in the room with the woman, but the couple says they were never alone with him, according to the Post.

The woman also alleges that she was forced to have an abortion and paid for the procedure out of her own pocket.